Woodland Serenity
NATURE
Woodland Serenity
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blooms-and-shrooms:

anémone pulsatille by zakia hadjadj on Flickr.
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4nimalparty:

First rays of light (by attila96)
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10bullets:

Headbangers (by Xenedis)
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faerieforests:

pink mushrooms revisited by Praju Vikas Anekal
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fawnoftheforestt:

heathenharnow:

Där långa skuggor ruva - Part V - IX, X, XI© Heathen Harnow - please do not remove credit

why can’t I live near a place like this?????
fawnoftheforestt:

heathenharnow:

Där långa skuggor ruva - Part V - IX, X, XI© Heathen Harnow - please do not remove credit

why can’t I live near a place like this?????
fawnoftheforestt:

heathenharnow:

Där långa skuggor ruva - Part V - IX, X, XI© Heathen Harnow - please do not remove credit

why can’t I live near a place like this?????
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creatures-alive:

World’s Deadliest - Super-Hearing Helps Owl Hunt by NatGeoWild
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marjoleinhoekendijk:

I love bumblebees so much💖💖💖
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our-amazing-world:

A pair of Great Egre Amazing World beautiful amazing
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sublim-ature:

Perthshire, ScotlandStuart Low
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eartheld:

0rient-express:

Etherow at dusk | by Andrew Kearton.

mostly nature
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1lifeinspired:

Swan in the Grass by hosieo on Flickr.
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libutron:

Mexican Pacific Lowlands Garter Snake  (Cape Garter Snake)
Thamnophis validus (Colubridae) is one of the several species recognized in the genus. This particular species is known by the common name of Mexican Pacific Lowlands Garter Snake because it occurs in part of the Pacific coast of Mexico, in the states of Baja California Sur, Colima, Guerrero, Jalisco, Michoacán, Nayarit, Sinaloa and Sonora.
Thamnophis validus celaeno (pictured) is the only subspecies of the Mexican Pacific Lowlands Garter Snake that occurs in Baja California, where apparently is confined to water systems in the Cape Region of the peninsula.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©kkchome | Locality: Baja California Sur, Mexico
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libutron:

Short-beaked echidna 
The Short-beaked echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus (Monotrematae - Tachyglossidae), is the most widely distributed endemic Australian mammal, and echidnas from different geographic areas differ so much in appearance that they have been assigned to several subspecies.
This is the tasmanian subspecies, Tachyglossus aculeatus setosus. They look a lot more cuddly and have a lot more hair than the ones on the Australian mainland that are all spines.
Echidnas lay shell covered eggs that hatch outside the mother’s body, and although they do not have teats, secrete milk through several pores in the belly.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Donovan Wilson | Locality: Tasmania
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somanycuteanimals:

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